Don’t try to find a picture…

This may be a strange title for a blog post about art, but they are wise words from the sketchbook of British painter Ivon Hitchens.

Hitchens career spanned 6 decades and a large part of it was spent painting the landscape around his home deep in the trees in West Sussex.  His early output couldn’t be further removed from his last paintings as he developed and refined his style and technique from pure representation to abstraction.  Hitchens was influenced by and an admirer of the late 19th and early 20th century French painters, but it was the writings of Clive bell and Roger Fry about “significant form” which was to become his moment of epiphany, and caused him to create my favourite early work “Curved Barn” painted in 1922.  While still very much a representational image of a barn in trees, the stylised forms and flowing curves highlight his awareness of shape and form, something that was to become increasingly important during his career.

Curved Barn by Ivon Hitchens
1922, oil on canvas
postcard published by Pallant House Gallery

One of the things about Hitchens’ work that appeals to me, is the draughtsmanship evident in his paintings.  At first glance some of his paintings can appear to be the result of random and sometimes haphazard placing of a colour on a canvas, yet on closer inspection these images reveal themselves to have the depth and structure brought about by careful planning.  Much as I love Hitchens’ work, I have to confess that I do find much of his mid-career work to be a little on the drab side colour-wise.  He seems to have had a fixation with the most hideous ‘hospital green’, often teaming it with other equally drab greens and greys tempered with sienna, umber, ochre and ultramarine, which dominate his landscapes of the mid 20th century.  His floral works are a complete contrast, and are my favourite genre in Hitchens oeuvre. Hitchens said about his floral painting “one can read into a good flower picture the same problems that one faces with a landscape, near and far, meanings and movement of shapes and brushstrokes.  You just keep playing with the object.”

Flower Piece by Ivon Hitchens
1943, oil on canvas
postcard published by Pallant House Gallery and Museums Sheffield

The current exhibition at Pallant House Gallery in Chichester, West Sussex is the largest retrospective of Hitchens work since 1989, showing over 70 works, covering most subject matters from his well known landscapes, flowers and interiors to some figure studies which show a strong influence of Matisse ‘Odelisques’.  Personally, I don’t think figurative work was Hitchens’ forte.  Moving through the exhibition rooms the works chart his progress on the route from representation to abstraction, with a group of 3 paintings being the perfect illustration of this being ‘Outflow’ from 1961, ‘Divided Oak’, 1958 and ‘Spring Millpond’ from 1950/51.  I have listed them as they are hung on the gallery wall, but really they should be hung with ‘Outflow and ‘Millpond’ reversed so the viewer can get a real sense of the move from the representational to the abstract.

Hitchens painted the same scenery for decades, not to achieve the perfect representation, but to express the feeling and spirit of these places.  During the 1960’s Hitchens bought a seaside home in Selsey and this was to rejuvenate his palette, casting aside the drab blue-green-greys and introducing vibrant blues, yellows, red and white.  Huge blocks of spectacular sumptuous colour now filled his canvasses.  The exhibition closes with a quote from T S Eliot which acknowledges Ivon Hitchens’ singular vision through the decades – “in my end is my beginning” and chimes perfectly with Hitchens’ own words from one of his sketchbooks –

Don’t try to find a picture.  Find a place you like and discover the picture in that”.

Publicity material for the exhibition –
Ivon Hitchens: Space through Colour
at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, West Sussex, UK
29 June to 13 October 2019